MI Attorney General Tricks those Fighting for Exoneree Rights

wica signing2It took over eight years in the MI legislature for the Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation Act (WICA) to eventually pass. The WICA was to provide some measure of financial compensation to those whose lives were unjustly ripped away from them by the State. When listening to the newscast from WoodTV, below, or reading the article on their website, you will learn that MI Attorney Bill Schuette is using some other state law which says that the filings must be made within 6 months from the time the WICA became law, even though the Act itself explicitly says 18 months!! Pathetically, the courts have agreed with him.

For argument sake only, that might have made sense, if it were not for one thing: the Attorney General's Office had a lot of influence on the formation of the WICA!

Read more: MI Attorney General Tricks those Fighting for Exoneree Rights

The Best System in the world! Really???

justice weeps4It's not perfect, but the US has the best criminal justice system in the world! Really???

I used to hear that phrase thrown around all the time. Perhaps it still is, but not in my circles. It was used as a preface before making a criticism. People want to improve the system, but not appear to be unpatriotic or unappreciative for what we have. I also have learned that it is a statement made by people who have no personal experience with our criminal justice system. 

Corruption can be from the top down when there is wrongdoing by the authorities. It can also permeate as a more insipid systemic cancer, where those with money or influence are given preferential treatment. From traffic tickets up through murder, a lot more poor people and people of color are convicted and wrongfully convicted. You might call it a legalized corruption.

Case in point: I've just watched a 50-minute video of a case that has been with Proving Innocence from our beginning: Fred Freeman (Temujin Kensu). Not only is it depressing as to what happened to an innocent person, but to hear the details of the things that were done by the authorities would shock and disillusion any law-abiding citizen.

Click here for the rest of the articleThe Best System in the world! Really???

Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."

WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.


Resonable Doubt SN1 key artThis particular post discusses a recent portrayal of the wrongful conviction of Temujin Kensu (formerly Fredrick Freeman) in the Macklem case, on the show “Reasonable Doubt” which aired on Investigation Discovery Channel, Season 1, Episode 10: Long-Distance Murder. The conclusions reached during the show compel attention to the fact that Scott Macklem’s murder remains unsolved.


Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."
07/19/17

Criminal defense attorney Melissa Lewkowicz spoke those words at the conclusion of the episode, as she and retired homicide detective Chris Anderson described the results of their investigation to the sister of Temujin Kensu. Ms. Lewkowicz called the prosecutor’s case "imaginary" and "conjecture." I wholeheartedly agree with the conclusions reached on the show. I am absolutely thrilled that the show’s producers have hired a private investigator to look into the case further, in the hope of achieving justice.

Read more: Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."

Post #3: Advocacy, Part I

WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #3: Advocacy, Part I
Date: 04/20/17

As an attorney, I find it repugnant that the defense attorney appointed to represent the accused person in the murder of Scott Macklem didn’t work harder to assure an acquittal. Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. After one interview with Scott’s pregnant fiancée, the police focused on one individual and one only - the wrong person.

Click here for more of the blogPost #3: Advocacy, Part I

Post #2: Reputations

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note:  Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment:  the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free.  This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #2:  Reputations
Date:  02/22/17
macklem
You may wonder how the investigation of the murder of Scott Macklem resulted in a wrongful conviction.  Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986.  Scott grew up in Croswell, Michigan.  His father was elected Mayor of Croswell in 1982, while Scott was attending Croswell-Lexington High School.  Scott’s father also owned an insurance agency in Croswell.  He was an influential member of the community.

Read more: Post #2: Reputations

Post #1: Misdirection

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #1: Misdirection
02/08/07
Scott Macklem was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. The man convicted in his murder did not have an opportunity or the means to carry out this crime. He was convicted based on what I am loathe to describe as circumstantial evidence, since it was actually hypothetical evidence, manufactured evidence, wild speculation, and copious references to the accused’s “bad character.” In fact, there is more than copious, actual evidence that this was a wrongful conviction. The wrongful conviction is another crime, which will be addressed in later posts. Suffice it to say, I’m convinced as is every legal scholar, independent law enforcement consultant and investigator who has looked at this case, that the person who killed Scott Macklem is still at large.

Click here for the complete article: Post #1: Misdirection

Why I Believe in the Reality of False Confessions - Part 1

“You’ve got to be kidding me! Why would anyone confess to something they didn’t do? I can’t believe that.” If I’ve heard it once, I’ve heard it one hundred times. When I first got involved with wrongful convictions, I had no problem believing false confessions occur. For me, they were commonplace. That’s right. Commonplace. So common that it took me a while to understand why other people have such a difficult time accepting that it really happens and it can destroy someone's life. Let me explain.

My Experience as a child
I always thought my two sisters and I were fairly “normal” growing up. Later, I found that in order to dispel such a myth, all I had to do was to get married. A spouse, coming from an entirely different family system, will be very quick to point out your idiosyncrasies and the weird ways of your family! So, it’s important to understand how different “normal” may be from family to family.

Read more: Why I Believe in the Reality of False Confessions - Part 1