Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."

WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.


Resonable Doubt SN1 key artThis particular post discusses a recent portrayal of the wrongful conviction of Temujin Kensu (formerly Fredrick Freeman) in the Macklem case, on the show “Reasonable Doubt” which aired on Investigation Discovery Channel, Season 1, Episode 10: Long-Distance Murder. The conclusions reached during the show compel attention to the fact that Scott Macklem’s murder remains unsolved.


Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."
07/19/17

Criminal defense attorney Melissa Lewkowicz spoke those words at the conclusion of the episode, as she and retired homicide detective Chris Anderson described the results of their investigation to the sister of Temujin Kensu. Ms. Lewkowicz called the prosecutor’s case "imaginary" and "conjecture." I wholeheartedly agree with the conclusions reached on the show. I am absolutely thrilled that the show’s producers have hired a private investigator to look into the case further, in the hope of achieving justice.

Read more: Post #4: “One Thing He Is Not; He Is Not The Killer Of Scott Macklem."

Post #3: Advocacy, Part I

WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #3: Advocacy, Part I
Date: 04/20/17

As an attorney, I find it repugnant that the defense attorney appointed to represent the accused person in the murder of Scott Macklem didn’t work harder to assure an acquittal. Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. After one interview with Scott’s pregnant fiancée, the police focused on one individual and one only - the wrong person.

Click here for more of the blogPost #3: Advocacy, Part I

Post #2: Reputations

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note:  Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment:  the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free.  This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #2:  Reputations
Date:  02/22/17
macklem
You may wonder how the investigation of the murder of Scott Macklem resulted in a wrongful conviction.  Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986.  Scott grew up in Croswell, Michigan.  His father was elected Mayor of Croswell in 1982, while Scott was attending Croswell-Lexington High School.  Scott’s father also owned an insurance agency in Croswell.  He was an influential member of the community.

Read more: Post #2: Reputations

Post #1: Misdirection

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #1: Misdirection
02/08/07
Scott Macklem was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. The man convicted in his murder did not have an opportunity or the means to carry out this crime. He was convicted based on what I am loathe to describe as circumstantial evidence, since it was actually hypothetical evidence, manufactured evidence, wild speculation, and copious references to the accused’s “bad character.” In fact, there is more than copious, actual evidence that this was a wrongful conviction. The wrongful conviction is another crime, which will be addressed in later posts. Suffice it to say, I’m convinced as is every legal scholar, independent law enforcement consultant and investigator who has looked at this case, that the person who killed Scott Macklem is still at large.

Click here for the complete article: Post #1: Misdirection